Mrs. Lisa Hambrick Barfoot

Subjects Taught
Advanced English 9, English 11, English 12, English 9

Education

B.A. History Auburn University 1981

J.D. Cumberland School of Law 1984

M.Ed. Secondary English Auburn University Montgomery 1999



Experience

Scottsboro High School 2005-present.  Courses taught: Dual Enrollment English, English 12, English 11, English 9, and Advanced English 9.

Trinity Presbyterian School 1996-2004.  Courses taught:  Adcanced Placement English Literature and Composition, Advanced Placement English Language and Composition, College Preparatory English 9, Western Humanities.



Bio

I am a native of Scottsboro.  My father Sam Hambrick and mother Edith Hambrick moved to Scottsboro in 1956. My father took the job as the junior high basketball coach, serving with his high school basketball coach, Q. K. Carter. My mother taught at Caldwell Elementary School for eighteen years, followed by a final twelve years as principal of Caldwell Elementary School. There were three girls in our family, and all three of us attended and graduated from Auburn University.  WAR EAGLE!  My sisters Jan and Joy both graduated in elementary education and began their teaching careers immediately upon graduation.  I, however, took a different path.  

I majored in history at Auburn and upon graduation entered Cumberland School of Law.  I graduated from Cumberland in 1984 and took a job in criminal appellate work at the Alabama State Attorney General's office.  For five years I endeavored to find my fit in the legal arena, but I grew continually dissatisfied.  In 1990, I left the legal profession and took a three year hiatus, wherein I moved to Washington, D. C. and worked in a bed and breakfast.  I enjoyed my three years in D.C.  I went to concerts at the Kennedy Center (George Winston actually walked out barefoot and dressed in blue jeans to perform), attended the National Gallery of Arts for gallery talks and lectures (I actually saw the touring Barnes Exhibit that had never been outside of Philadelphia), explored the Smithsonian Museums, took a tour of the White House at Christmas, attended the lighting of the White House Christmas tree, experienced my first IMAX movie, attended the Ford Theater (I saw the same play Lincoln was watching when he was assassinated), watched the July 4th fireworks display while sitting on the hillside of the Iwo Jima Monument, attended the free Washington Times sponsored Shakespeare play.   These three years became a renaissance--a time of rebirth--for me.  Suddenly I saw that I loved to learn and explore; I was feeding my insatiable curiosity. 

In a new locale and with a renewed spirit, I now embarked on an inward journey.  This period of self-discovery brought me to realize what I wanted to be when I grew up: a teacher.  Coming from a family of educators, I swore that I would never teach.  Never say never!  After my three years in Washington, D.C., I pursued a teaching career.  I moved to Montgomery, Alabama and enrolled in Auburn University Montgomery.  While I was working on my graduate degree, I lived with my younger sister Joy, who was teaching at Montgomery Academy.  Although my undergraduate degree was in history, I decided that I wanted to teach English.  Before I could enroll in the graduate program, I had to take five undergraduate courses of English.  Foolishly perhaps, I took all five courses (Shakespeare's histories and commedies, creative writing of poetry, transformational grammar, literary criticism, and expository writing).  I was so eager to begin my graduate studies.  Perhaps too eager, I would never recommend five English courses in one semester. 

In my final semester of coursework, I was contacted by Trinity Presbyterian School about an English teaching position as a ninth grade English teacher.  I interviewed and accepted the position.  The school had seen three different ninth grade teachers in the last three years.  Note:  Not every teacher can teach ninth graders.  I have always taught ninth grade English and hopefully will always teach ninth grade English.  I love the energy and enthusiasm ninth graders bring to the classroom.  I love that the course emphasizes all three types of literature: World, British, and American literature.  I love the fact that I see my students begin their high school studies career.  I love my job!



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